What Young Christians Read

-Benny Warnick, A&E Editor

Some students read everything that they can get their hands on. Others won’t read much more than their class textbooks (if they even read that much). All that to say, Christian literature has been known to help a plethora of Christian students learn and grow in their walks with Christ. MC students voiced their opinions on their favorite Christian authors, ones that they find most beneficial for every young Christian to look into for personal reading.

Matt Chandler, pastor of The Village Church in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas, is a key figure in popular literature among young Christians. Author of such books as “The Explicit Gospel” and leader of the Acts 29 Network of church planting, Chandler emerged as a raw and authentic presenter of the Gospel message, challenging and encouraging the body of Christ to mold their Christian worldviews.

“What I love about Chandler is his passion to serve his readers and congregation to the best of his ability,” said MC student Wesleigh Taylor. “He is unashamedly honest; he doesn’t shy away from hard topics while bringing the truth of the Gospel, humor, and real-life understanding to his teachings. You are completely aware of his God-given ability and his humanness at the same time…he isn’t trying to fool people.”

Timothy Keller is another author with increasing popularity among MC students. Keller, pastor of Manhattan’s Redeemer Presbyterian Church and a guest speaker at MC in 2014, has received praise for his bestselling books “The Reason for God” and “The Prodigal God.” Keller’s focus on evangelism (in the midst of American urban culture) encourages the spread of the Gospel from city to city, realizing the importance of a grace perspective in telling others about Christ.

Christian Books

            “Keller gives profound insight on how we rebel in various ways,” Grant Gilliam said. “His books give us a great interpretation of the constant love and forgiveness of our Lord.”

Lovers of classic Christian literature at MC note C.S. Lewis as a figure in profound thought and creative practicality for readers who love to think and analyze the many facets of the Christian experience. Most known for his “The Chronicles of Narnia” series, Lewis has also written a wide variety of literature with a more philosophical approach to life lessons regarding a walk with Christ.

“False pride is something I’ve been guilty of more often than I would like to admit,” said Chad Perry. “Lewis says in ‘Mere Christianity’ that ‘True humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less.’ That quote is a reminder that serving others doesn’t necessarily mean to make yourself subordinate to everyone else, but it does require you to realize you’re not struggling alone. You’re not diminishing your own self worth at all. You’re building on it.”

Many of the aforementioned books can be found at MC’s Leland Speed Library or at various Christian retailers such as LifeWay Christian Book Store.

Other Christian Books MC Students Recommend:

-“Love Does” by Bob Goff

-“The Battlefield of the Mind” by Joyce Meyer

-“Because He Loves Me” by Ella Fitzpatrick

-“Jesus>Religion” by Jefferson Bethke

-“Kisses from Katie” by Katie Davis

-“Desiring God” by John Piper

-“To Live is Christ” by Beth Moore

-“Crazy Love” by Francis Chan

-“Humility” by Andrew Murray

Source: http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/08/08/meet-the-texas-preacher-who-survived-brain-cancer-and-may-be-one-of-the-most-prominent-pastors-youve-never-heard-of/

Source: http://www.timothykeller.com

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